Thursday, 21 January 2016


This quirky little church looks as if it's wearing a jaunty nightcap, doesn't it? The river Lambourn looked shivery cold - two herons flew overhead - and in the beech woods of Welford Park, literally millions of snowdrops and quite a lot of aconites are just peeping through, though it will be a couple of weeks yet before they'll look like snowdrifts under the trees.
Did you know that snowdrops multiply to a Fibonacci sequence? 1-1-2-3-5-8-13-21 ... so by year 5, the first snowdrop's offspring have already started reproducing themselves ... and on and on it goes ... I find that strangely pleasing. It's definitely the most interesting thing I have learned this week.
Hard to imagine that in early summer the Park is home to the Bake-Off tent. (You can still see the big patch on the lawn.) And the garden by then will be a mass of peonies and roses.

6 comments:

Sue said...

I don't think my snowdrops know about Fibonacci...

mary said...

Maybe your squirrels do, Sue!

Cosy Books said...

I do love flower talk at this stage of winter. When it's -10C for days on end the only thing to do is head to the local garden centre for a bit of respite.

mary said...

There has been talk of snowdrop honey, it has been so warm here, Darlene.

Lucille said...

I had big hopes for snowdrops under silver birches and planted lots in the green but nothing has shown yet.

mary said...

Maybe you're only on Fibonacci year 1 or 2, Lucille. Silver brirches and snowdrops sound lovely.